Final wood panel installed on Brock Commons

It seems like just last week we were writing about construction beginning on a new dormitory and now it’s finishing up. The world’s tallest wood building installed the last wood panel last week, wrapping up this stage of construction in an impressive 66 days. After this milestone, focus will turn to completing the interior and preparing the building for the 404 University of British Columbia students that will soon call the dormitory home. Construction is expected to be fully completed in 2017.

Brock Commons 5
(The last wood panels being installed on Brock Commons. Photo credit: Unknown)

Acton Ostry Architects, the firm that designed Brock Commons, posted on Twitter a time lapse of the construction process. REMI Network details the project, saying the building is made up of 1302 glulam columns and 464 CLT panels.

Construction on Brock Commons wouldn’t be possible without a team of experts. The engineered wood products were provided by Structurlam and made from locally harvested trees. The structural engineering firm, Fast + Epp, used the nature of wood to produce the 18 story building. Paul Fast, founder of Fast + Epp, said of Brock Commons, “We pushed ourselves relentlessly over months of work with the design team and the CLT manufacturer to simplify the structure — think LEGO. The building blends the simplicity and modularity of LEGO with the concrete-like strength of cross laminated timber to help ensure structural efficiency which in the past has been one of the major barriers to building tall with wood. Our solutions effectively address that concern.”

As if being the tallest wood building isn’t enough, Brock Commons also comes with a great view.

To read more about Brock Commons, check out our other blog posts, “Construction on UBC’s new wood dormitory begins” and “Construction on UBC dorm continues.”

Construction on UBC dorm continues

Back in June, we wrote about construction beginning on University of British Columbia’s new timber dormitory. Pictures of the construction process have just been made available and the frame is quickly taking shape.

Brock Commons 2
(Construction is underway on July 18th for the new 18 story dormitory at UBC. Photo credit: Acton Ostry Architects Inc. & University of British Columbia)

Brock Commons
(More than half of the floors have started to become assembled. Photo credit: Acton Ostry Architects Inc. & University of British Columbia)

Canadian Architect reports that a new floor is being built every 3 days and is expected to increase. The dormitory is made out of a combination of glue laminated timber (glulam) and cross laminated timber (CLT). The building is scheduled to be complete by Spring 2017.

Plans for tallest hybrid timber structure in the world revealed

Preliminary plans were recently revealed for the tallest hybrid timber structure in the world, Architectural Digest announced. Japanese architect Shigeru Ban and Vancouver developer PortLiving have teamed up to build a residential building thought to break current records.

shigeru-bans-first-canadian-project-tallest-hybrid-timber-structure-world-01
(Design rendering of the planned Terrace House. Photo credit: PortLiving)

Details for the project are still under wraps, but it is believed the skyscraper will be the tallest hybrid timber structure in the world once complete.  The building, currently known as Terrace House, will be located in an area of Vancouver called Coal Harbor.  Nick Mafi reports that the upper portion of the structure will be a combination of a timber frame supported by a concrete and steel core.

Vancouver is not a stranger to building with mass timber. Construction at University of British Columbia’s campus is underway for an 18 story tall dormitory.

Construction on UBC’s new wood dormitory begins

Vancouver will soon have the world’s tallest mass-timber building. Construction has begun at the future home of University of British Columbia’s 18 story tall dormitory. At 53 meters tall (173 feet), Brock Commons student housing will be 4 stories taller than Treet in Norway which currently holds the title for tallest mass-timber building.

As The Province reports, construction began this week as engineered wood panels and pillars were trucked in. All the engineered wood products are made off site by Structurlam Products and delivered.  The building will consist of cross-laminated-timber (CLT) floors and walls held up by pillars composed of glue-laminated wood (glulam).

Nicholas Sills, a supervisor at Structurlam, told The Province, “If you can panelize (materials) and put things together tightly like a Lego kit of parts, it can be extremely efficient…We hope this project goes up very, very fast.”

To see pictures of the building under construction, watch the video by David Rigler in The Province’s “UBC’s timber tower starts to rise.”

 

Quebec City ready for Origine

Nordic Structures is in the final planning stages to build the 13 story tall Origine apartment building in Quebec City. After 18 months of planning and testing, the apartment block is getting ready. According to Global Construction Review, Origine will be made of 7-layer black spruce CLT panels and finished with an aluminum facade.

NORDIC_Origine_1(Conceptual design for Nordic Structure’s Origine building. Photo credit: Nordic Structures)

Yvan Blouin Architecte is the architecture firm responsible for designing the building. It will contain 94 one-, two-, and three-bedroom apartments and will be located in Quebec City’s Pointe-aux-Lièvres eco-district.

NORDIC_Origine_5
(Conceptual design for the interior and city view for Origine. Photo credit: Nordic Structures)

Read more about Origine at Nordic Structure’s project page.

Cities across Canada turn to wood for condos

Canada’s condominium construction industry is embracing wood all across the country. According to the Metro Toronto, there has been a rise in the number of condominiums built out of wood– with no signs of stopping. Cost and design are highlighted as two of the benefits to using wood in mid-rise condos.

CABIN Condos(CABIN Condominiums, one of the wood condominiums being built in Canada. Photo credit: Curated Properties)

Recent changes to provincial building codes are credited for the surge of wood mid-rise buildings up to six stories in Ontario and British Columbia. The limit in most of the other jurisdictions is only four stories. Building codes which allow for more wood could change for the entire country with modifications to the National Building Code of Canada.

Read the full article about this wood condo surge at Metro Toronto.